I moderated a panel discussion earlier this week at the Greater Reston Arts Center with many of the artists from “BITE,” an exhibit curated by Jefferson Pinder. The underlying premise of the exhibit: to use humor to “shed light on issues of personal struggle in mainstream society” and to challenge “cultural norms that dictate expectations of who we are supposed to be.” The conversation touched on many broad themes such as racial identity, youthful angst, the feeling of powerlessness, feelings of inferiority about your place in the world, standards of beauty, and living within the boxes that society has created for us. To me, all of these artistic explorations have one thing in common: they are all fear-based emotions. Art is a way to grapple with these emotions, and adding humor to the art makes navigating those emotions a little less frightening. 
Some good thoughts from Katlin Chadwick HERE.
The painting is “Careless” by Ed Bisese.

I moderated a panel discussion earlier this week at the Greater Reston Arts Center with many of the artists from “BITE,” an exhibit curated by Jefferson Pinder. The underlying premise of the exhibit: to use humor to “shed light on issues of personal struggle in mainstream society” and to challenge “cultural norms that dictate expectations of who we are supposed to be.” The conversation touched on many broad themes such as racial identity, youthful angst, the feeling of powerlessness, feelings of inferiority about your place in the world, standards of beauty, and living within the boxes that society has created for us. To me, all of these artistic explorations have one thing in common: they are all fear-based emotions. Art is a way to grapple with these emotions, and adding humor to the art makes navigating those emotions a little less frightening. 

Some good thoughts from Katlin Chadwick HERE.

The painting is “Careless” by Ed Bisese.